Putting Sleep Disorders to Bed

They found that the mice that lacked this protein overcame disruptions to their circadian clocks more quickly. In modern society, with the frequency of trans-time zone travel, we often deal with annoying jet lag problems, which usually require a couple of weeks of transition, says Dr.Ruifeng Cao, a postdoctoral fellow who works with Drs. Sonenberg and Amir, However, by inducing a state like jet lag in the mice lacking that protein, we found they were able to adapt to time zones changes in about half of the time required by regular mice. Furthermore, the researchers found that a small protein that is critical for brain clock function, vasoactive intestinal peptide or VIP, was increased in the mice lacking the protein 4E-BP1. The results indicate that the functioning of the circadian clock could be improved by genetic manipulations, opening doors on new ways to treat circadian clock-related disorders.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.newswise.com/articles/putting-sleep-disorders-to-bed

Sleep disorder multiplies depression risk

Now, new research is identifying more sleep problems and also calling for routing screening for primary sleep disorders. When they performed sleep studies of 343 people meeting the Fukuda definition of ME/CFS, they found that 104 – nearly a third – had a primary sleep disorder that explained their symptoms, and thus didn’t have ME/CFS at all. A 1/3 misdiagnosis rate is enough of a reason to look more closely for sleep disorders. In those who didn’t have primary sleep disorders, just under 90% met the criteria for at least one measurable sleep problem. Researchers identified four different groups based on sleep abnormalities. They were: Group 1: Slower to get to sleep, delayed Rapid Eye Movement (REM), lower percentages of stage 2 and REM sleep; Group 2: More frequent awakenings; Group 3: Longer total sleep time, less delayed REM sleep, higher percentage of REM sleep, lower percentage of wake time; Group 4: Shortest total sleep time, highest percentage of wake time after sleep onset. Researchers concluded that doctors need to routinely screen for sleep disorders when considering an ME/CFS diagnosis, and that they should use sleep studies to identify sleep problems and tailor treatments to the specific groups.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://chronicfatigue.about.com/b/2013/07/19/sleep-disorders-in-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-2.htm

Sleep Disorders in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

The data was drawn from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), an annual survey conducted by the CDC. Health.com: 7 tips for the best sleep ever Six percent of men and 3% of women had received a sleep apnea diagnosis, the survey found, while 7% of men and 4% of women reported breathing problems on at least five nights per week. Depression was assessed using a standard questionnaire that asked how often during the past two weeks the participants had “little interest or pleasure in doing things” or felt “down, depressed or hopeless,” for instance. Five percent of men and 8% of women had scores indicating “probable” depression, according to the researchers.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.cnn.com/2012/03/30/health/conditions/sleep-apnea-depression/

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